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From Interesting Literature

"In our pick of Gerard Manley Hopkins’s best poems, we included ‘God’s Grandeur’, a sonnet celebrating ‘the grandeur of God’. Hopkins was one of the greatest religious poets of the entire nineteenth century, and this poem shows how he attained that reputation."

Read more: Dr. Oliver Tearle, Interesting Literature
Comments: 0

From The American Conservative

"We live in an anti-culture. It’s killing itself. Firsts is a small thing, but its importance lies in its banality. This is the poison we feed our children as their daily bread."

Read more: Rod Dreher, The American Conservative
Comments: 0

From The Guardian

"In The Classic Fairy Tales, Iona and Peter Opie write that the French author’s 'achievement was that he accepted the fairy tales at their own level' and 'recounted them without impatience, without mockery, and without feeling they required any aggrandisement, such as a frame-story, though he did end each tale with a rhymed moralité.'"

Read more: Alison Flood, The Guardian
Topics: Books, History
Comments: 2

From Glamour

"It trades quite interestingly in female rivalries and competitiveness, and I think one of the ways in which Lizzie really excels herself is to sort of rise above any of that. So, you have Caroline Bingley, who is Mr. Bingley’s sister, who is constantly trying to score points by trying to evince an admission in Darcy that Elizabeth is beneath him and rather plain and rather uninteresting, and all it does is of course embarrass Caroline and make her feel weak. Lizzie sees exactly what [Caroline] is doing and always manages to rise above. Lizzie will distance herself from a situation where other people would blindly try too hard."

Read more: Rosamund Pike, interviewed by Anna Moeslein, Glamour
Comments: 0

From The Washington Post

"Reading together can happen in a living room or a dining room or in a back yard, in a classroom or in a car or in a Florida room on a wrought-iron couch. Within the confines of a story shared aloud, we get to see one another in new ways. Our hearts are open to the story and open to one another -- and because of this, some kind of subterranean magic occurs. Reading aloud binds us together in unanticipated ways.

"It brings us home."

Read more: Kate DiCamillo, The Washington Post
Comments: 0

From Mental Floss

"It’s a fantastical story featuring interstellar travel; alien planets; an evil, disembodied brain; and a world under siege from an unknown force. But ultimately, A Wrinkle in Time is grounded in human concerns that L’Engle knew all too well. 'Of course I’m Meg,' she once said. Where the stories of Meg and her author diverge, aside from the interplanetary jaunts and interactions with mystical creatures, is that Meg saves her father. In doing so, she becomes empowered with the knowledge that she can take care of herself, even if she can’t save the world. 'Indeed, the crux of the book rests on Meg’s coming to understand that her father cannot save her or Charles Wallace, or make the world a less anxious place,' wrote Meghan O’Rourke for Slate in 2007. 'Part of the task she faces is, simply, accepting the evil that is in the world while continuing to battle against it.'"

Read more: Jen Doll, Mental Floss
Comments: 0

From The Imaginative Conservative

"Can you imagine Laura’s face if someone told her that a day would come when parents would beg, bait, nag, and cajole children into reading? To the Ingalls family, reading was better than dessert. How could any child not want to read?"

Read more: Maura Roan McKeegan, The Imaginative Conservative
Comments: 2

From The New York Daily News

"Stephenie Meyer dropped a brand new 'Twilight' novel on Tuesday to celebrate the book’s 10th anniversary, and it includes a major twist.

"In 'Life and Death: Twilight Reimagined,' Meyer swapped the genders of her main characters, including iconic lovebirds Bella Swan and Edward Cullen."

Read more: Kirthana Ramisetti, The New York Daily News
Comments: 0

From Fathers for Good

"My sophomore son had some strange summer reading. I was so intrigued by the books -- and wary -- that I did it with him."

Read more: Brian Caulfield, Fathers for Good
Comments: 0

From Intellectual Takeout

"If you’re like me, you’re always on the lookout for great literature for your children. Or, perhaps you’re looking to catch up on some novels that you may have missed out on when you were growing up."

Read more: Daniel Lattier, Intellectual Takeout
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 0

From Acculturated

"Judy Blume, the author who wrote books about sex for kids[,] is now lamenting that kids are too sexual."

Read more: Ashley E. McGuire, Acculturated
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 0

From The Imaginative Conservative

"Another facet of Chesterton’s 'Ethics of Elfland' which would prove inspirational to Tolkien and Lewis was Chesterton’s insistence that myths and fairy stories were not unbelievable, in the sense that they conveyed untruths, but were the most believable things in the world because they conveyed truths and taught lessons that the world needed to know and learn:

"'The things I believed most then, the things I believe most now, are the things called fairy tales. They seem to me to be the entirely reasonable things….Fairyland is nothing but the sunny country of common sense. It is not earth that judges heaven, but heaven that judges earth; so for me at least it was not earth that criticised elfland, but elfland that criticised the earth.'"

Read more: Joseph Pearce, The Imaginative Conservative
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From Acts of Faith

"The 150th anniversary of 'Alice in Wonderland' has been widely celebrated this year, but it is odd, a recent essay at the New Yorker notes . . . how seldom the religion of its author, Lewis Carroll, is considered."

Read more: Karen Swallow Prior, Acts of Faith, The Washington Post
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 0

From The New York Times

"I recognized the face -- the square jaw, deep-set eyes -- but with an expression not like what I’d noted in the few images extant of her. There was a liveliness, a boisterousness even. A sense of great, convivial vitality."

Read more: Roy Hoffman, The New York Times
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From Grammarly

"What does it mean to be a father? Dads approach fatherhood in a variety of ways, from overbearing to 'wrapped around your little finger,' and everything in between. There’s no formula for the perfect father, but there are some commonalities among father figures in literature that make the concept of fatherhood a powerful one."

Read more: Allison VanNest, Grammarly Blog, Grammarly
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 1

From Verily

"If Austen has taught me anything, it’s that not only are women strong, but there is also an incredible amount of ways with which they can manifest this strength—that society’s definition of a strong woman does not always account for the strength in her heart and for the thoughts, feelings, and hopes that bloom there, which say more about her than the self she communicates on the outside."

Read more: Lindsey Weishar, Verily
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 0

From The Washington Post Magazine

"Ask these huddles of third- through sixth-graders why they like 'Dork Diaries' so much, and they’ll excitedly say it’s because of 'the humor' and 'the cliffhangers' and 'the drama.' McNair teacher JC Thomas says a deeper reason, based on classroom feedback, is that the kids just plain relate to the adolescent characters."

Read more: Michael Cavna, The Washington Post Magazine, The Washington Post
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 0

From The Switch

"Nancy -- and surely the world is on a first-name basis with her by now -- has a classic can-do attitude and stunning reserves of pluck that make her role model for any time, said Jenn Fisher, president of the series fan club, the Nancy Drew Sleuths. 'Her forwardness, her independence and her zeal to solve everything no matter how baffling -- she inspires.'"

Read more: Hayley Tsukayama, The Switch, The Washington Post

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From Christ & Pop Culture

"The plot serves well as an adolescent girl's fantasy: here is a handsome, kind, smart boy who loves her (the real her) and waits patiently for her to come to her senses and love him back -- all while he prepares diligently for medical school. But I think the story offers something more too, containing elements of reality in the same way that Jane Austen's parlor dramas do despite being so limited in scale (if not in scope). The reality of Anne of Green Gables is heightened -- this is partly the point of the novels -- but the novels contain truth, just the same."

Read more: S. D. Kelly, Christ & Pop Culture
Rating: 0.00
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From The Wall Street Journal

"Ms. Voiklis said she wanted readers to know the book wasn’t a simple allegory of communism. Instead, it’s about the risk of any country—including a democracy—placing too much value on security. The tension between safety and personal freedom is an idea that resonates in today’s politics."

Read more: Jennifer Maloney, The Wall Street Journal
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 1

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