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From Acculturated

"Judy Blume, the author who wrote books about sex for kids[,] is now lamenting that kids are too sexual."

Read more: Ashley E. McGuire, Acculturated
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From The Imaginative Conservative

"Another facet of Chesterton’s 'Ethics of Elfland' which would prove inspirational to Tolkien and Lewis was Chesterton’s insistence that myths and fairy stories were not unbelievable, in the sense that they conveyed untruths, but were the most believable things in the world because they conveyed truths and taught lessons that the world needed to know and learn:

"'The things I believed most then, the things I believe most now, are the things called fairy tales. They seem to me to be the entirely reasonable things….Fairyland is nothing but the sunny country of common sense. It is not earth that judges heaven, but heaven that judges earth; so for me at least it was not earth that criticised elfland, but elfland that criticised the earth.'"

Read more: Joseph Pearce, The Imaginative Conservative
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From Acts of Faith

"The 150th anniversary of 'Alice in Wonderland' has been widely celebrated this year, but it is odd, a recent essay at the New Yorker notes . . . how seldom the religion of its author, Lewis Carroll, is considered."

Read more: Karen Swallow Prior, Acts of Faith, The Washington Post
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From The New York Times

"I recognized the face -- the square jaw, deep-set eyes -- but with an expression not like what I’d noted in the few images extant of her. There was a liveliness, a boisterousness even. A sense of great, convivial vitality."

Read more: Roy Hoffman, The New York Times
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From Grammarly

"What does it mean to be a father? Dads approach fatherhood in a variety of ways, from overbearing to 'wrapped around your little finger,' and everything in between. There’s no formula for the perfect father, but there are some commonalities among father figures in literature that make the concept of fatherhood a powerful one."

Read more: Allison VanNest, Grammarly Blog, Grammarly
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From Verily

"If Austen has taught me anything, it’s that not only are women strong, but there is also an incredible amount of ways with which they can manifest this strength—that society’s definition of a strong woman does not always account for the strength in her heart and for the thoughts, feelings, and hopes that bloom there, which say more about her than the self she communicates on the outside."

Read more: Lindsey Weishar, Verily
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From The Washington Post Magazine

"Ask these huddles of third- through sixth-graders why they like 'Dork Diaries' so much, and they’ll excitedly say it’s because of 'the humor' and 'the cliffhangers' and 'the drama.' McNair teacher JC Thomas says a deeper reason, based on classroom feedback, is that the kids just plain relate to the adolescent characters."

Read more: Michael Cavna, The Washington Post Magazine, The Washington Post
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From The Switch

"Nancy -- and surely the world is on a first-name basis with her by now -- has a classic can-do attitude and stunning reserves of pluck that make her role model for any time, said Jenn Fisher, president of the series fan club, the Nancy Drew Sleuths. 'Her forwardness, her independence and her zeal to solve everything no matter how baffling -- she inspires.'"

Read more: Hayley Tsukayama, The Switch, The Washington Post

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From Christ & Pop Culture

"The plot serves well as an adolescent girl's fantasy: here is a handsome, kind, smart boy who loves her (the real her) and waits patiently for her to come to her senses and love him back -- all while he prepares diligently for medical school. But I think the story offers something more too, containing elements of reality in the same way that Jane Austen's parlor dramas do despite being so limited in scale (if not in scope). The reality of Anne of Green Gables is heightened -- this is partly the point of the novels -- but the novels contain truth, just the same."

Read more: S. D. Kelly, Christ & Pop Culture
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From The Wall Street Journal

"Ms. Voiklis said she wanted readers to know the book wasn’t a simple allegory of communism. Instead, it’s about the risk of any country—including a democracy—placing too much value on security. The tension between safety and personal freedom is an idea that resonates in today’s politics."

Read more: Jennifer Maloney, The Wall Street Journal
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From Religion Dispatches

"Montgomery, who published the CYOA books after Packard’s idea was rejected repeatedly by more mainstream presses, believed the innovative, role-playing format of the stories taught a moral lesson. They were designed from a humanist, spiritual-but-not-religious perspective. They engaged readers with Montgomery’s core belief, illustrating again and again a central value of human agency and responsibility."

Read more: Daniel Silliman, Religion Dispatches
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From Radio Times

"All in all, Branagh was keen to stick to the positive essence of the story, and not to 'create a hopeless world... I believe the opposite is possible, and actually frankly unusual. I felt that it was important. I had heard too many people come to a story saying, "I see it as very dark".'"

Read more: Ellie Walker-Arnott, Radio Times
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From The Guardian

"Jane Austen would have been very proud of young adult fiction readers this week. Using the #RealisticYA and #VeryRealisticYA hashtags, many have been lining up to puncture the genre’s often fantastical plots with fragments of narrative in a rather more ordinary key. For instance, @corpsehands wrote 'a teen finds out there are werewolves at the school. they’d investigate, but they have a LOT of homework to do.'

"Such miniature parodies of dystopian sagas and supernatural romances, filling Twitter with ordinary girls and boys forswearing epic quests and magical initiations to get on with revision or household chores, continue a tradition that dates back to Northanger Abbey -- and beyond."

Read more: Jenny McAuley, Books blog, The Guardian
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From Ethika Politika

"I like to think about my children (when I have them) leafing through National Geographic, or First Things, or the National Catholic Register, steeping themselves in the good lessons and instruction that these institutions communicate: about the beauty of creation, right morality and Christian society, the Catholic life. A recent Wall Street Journal column, '"Calvin and Hobbes": America’s Most Profound Comic Strip,' reminded me that I want them reading Bill Watterson’s iconic creation also, and for similar reasons: It just may be the most educative and instructive art one could want in a contemporary Christian home."

Read more: Michael Bradley, Ethika Politika
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From Slate

"'Death, too, has a sense of humor,' Terry Pratchett wrote in The Color of Magic. In his own turn, Pratchett had a sense of humor about death. Indeed, few authors have written about death with more good-natured bemusement than Pratchett, who died today at 66."

Read more: Jacob Brogan, Browbeat, Slate
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From The Washington Post

"Shakespeare’s plays contain anti-Semitism, racism and sexism, sexual abuse and violence; they magnify the tenor of their age. But should they be censored when they might offend a particular community?"

Read more: Preti Taneja, PostEverything, The Washington Post
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From Roman Roads Media

"While it may be daunting to pick up the Great Books and start reading, make 2015 the year you do it WITH your kids, and earn some FREE curriculum in the process!"

Read more: Roman Roads Media
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From B&N Teen Blog

"It was hard to see the end of so many great series in 2014—but for every series that closes, another one opens."

Read more: Dahlia Adler, B&N Teen Blog, Barnes and Noble
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From Catholic Digest

"Utopian and dystopian fiction often ask the same big questions: What makes for human happiness and well-being? What does it mean to be human? What kind of world should we aspire to? What obstacles must we avoid?"

Read more: Steven D. Greydanus, Catholic Digest
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From The Hollywood Reporter

"Constantin Film, the production company that controls the rights to Cassandra Clare's best-selling YA fantasy franchise and which produced The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones film, is relaunching Mortal Instruments as a high-end drama series."

Read more: Scott Roxborough, The Hollywood Reporter
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See all articles in the archive.


Note: A link on this page does not constitute an endorsement from BreakPoint. It simply means that we thought that the linked news item or opinion piece would be of interest to Christian parents of teens and preteens.