Mixing Hospitality, Conversation and Truth


Dinner Thomas Aquinas once said that civilization was constituted on conversation.

Down through history, thought leaders have used the meal table and conversation to advance ideas and discuss the weighty issues of the day. Examples include Ben Franklin and the Junto society in Philadelphia, Thomas Jefferson and the Governor's Palace group in colonial Williamsburg, William Wilberforce and the Clapham Circle, and John Newton and the Eclectic society at the Castle-and-Falcon Pub. Of course, we dare not forget the Inklings. This group, which included C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien, used to meet at the Eagle and Child Pub on Tuesday nights for food, drink and conversation.

In this age of sound bites, commercialism and hourly Britney Spears updates, our culture is starved for meaningful conversation.

A small group of Christians have sought to recapture the notion of "conversational mealing." The concept is simple. Create an event that encourages critical thinking, conversation and interaction. Invite an eclectic group to gather around a hosted table for a structured discussion about the ideas of the day. Build community, practice hospitality and advance the cultural conversation about truth and why it matters.

Curious? Follow this link and explore.


Comments:

" "conversational mealings"? Maybe they could also rediscover the English language whilst they are at it. " Only could they learn if thou wouldst deign to grace their meetings by thine most august presence, dear lab. Your postings are always a treatise in what was once called "charity".
"conversational mealings"? Maybe they could also rediscover the English language whilst they are at it.
"Thanks, Jason - I was wondering how to invite my Messianic Jewish friends to a meal named after a pig." Actually I am not a Messianic. I am a Philo-semite. I could imagine being a Messianic as long as it is understood that I would follow the traditions for the sake of esprit-de-corps, and "honor-thy-father-and-mother" rather then thinking them commanded to Christians. Which, as far as I know is the attitude of actual Messianics. There is no Messianic synagogue near my church and switching is a bit of a bother so I settle for the rather cheesey folkways of my anglo-evangelical church. I also approve of Messianics because I tend to believe it was an appalling error of previous missionaries to not allow converts to retain their native customs when those customs were not themselves sinful. And it was worse then apalling for the Early Church to demand that Jews abandon their customs, which in effect gave them the horrible dilemma of unnecessarily having to choose between salvation and tribal honor. It was in effect the same sin as the Judaiizers committed in Paul's day-in reverse. It is as well that it is rectified. By the way speaking of pigs, here is another war-story from our history-buff here. During the Siege of Jerusalem in 1948 there was a French Monastery in the middle of the city that had a curious immunity. Hungry as everyone was neither the Jews nor the Arabs would plunder them and they were able to eat well. Because their main rations consisted of pork.
Thanks, Jason - I was wondering how to invite my Messianic Jewish friends to a meal named after a pig.
Coffeehouses also fill that roll. At one time every group and occupation had one. There was the revolutionaries coffeehouse, the reactionaries coffeehouse. The merchants coffeehouse, the ships-captains coffeehouse, the artists, and the poets. In some ways they fulfill that roll today. God bless Starbucks! And toast L'Chaim(To Live)! With coffee of course.
Lee, perhaps if you wouldn't give them an uncharitable reading. For example, you totally misread my tone on that one.




BreakPoint Blog

Banner