Recent Point Posts

I truly don't know what to make of this trending story about schoolchildren playing a pencil game that's supposed to summon a spirit. On a surface level it sounds ridiculous, and there may very well be an explanation that doesn't involve demons. But on the other hand, how different is it from, say, the Ouija board or the "up table" game? My mother's account of some spooky experiences with the latter in her childhood was enough to make me extremely leery of all such things, so I don't intend to try the "Charlie" game to see if it's for real!

I was struck, however, by something Simcha Fisher wrote about this game: "I was chatting with my husband about how these things are forbidden even if we don't really believe they will work, and he pointed out that the devil may actually prefer it when people sell their souls lightly."
Read More >
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 0
Relativism not only damages our perception of truth and goodness but of beauty as well.

On May 13, the Daily Mail reported that a Mark Rothko piece called “Untitled (Yellow and Blue)” sold at a New York auction. About eight by six feet in size, the painting consists of a solid yellow background half covered by blue. Basically, a four year old could have produced this painting using a bed sheet and a few bottles of Crayola paint. Unimpressive as the painting appears, however, it sold for $46.5 million dollars.

Now, hold on a second. How could anyone value this uncreative work of art so much?
Read More >
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 1
As reported in a New York Times article from May 20, President Obama used his commencement address to the graduates of the Coast Guard Academy to emphasize the importance of combating climate change. During the address, Obama asserted that "climate change constitutes a serious threat to global security, an immediate risk to our national security, and, make no mistake, it will impact how our military defends our country." As a result, he argued, "We need to act, and we need to act now."
Read More >
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 0
For some reason, the news from Ireland this weekend hit me hard. Maybe it was just the cognitive dissonance of a nation voting to approve same-sex marriage when it still retains enough of its Christian heritage to outlaw abortion (for the moment, at least). Or maybe it was the people I saw celebrating all over social media -- quite a few of them Christians. Come to think of it, those two are pretty closely related.

There's definitely something jarring going on within the church; there has been for a while now. Most of us here have probably felt that mental sucker punch, and the feelings of loneliness and isolation that sometimes accompany it, when a favorite Christian writer or blogger or friend or relative suddenly makes it clear that not only does he or she support SSM, but is shocked and appalled that other Christians don't. This has become a more and more frequent experience in recent days. In season and out of season, it goes on. (Of course, it happens with non-Christians we like and admire as well, but it's especially jarring when it happens with Christians.) Read More >
Rating: 5.00
Comments: 1
In this weekend's New York Times Magazine, bestselling Young Adult author Judy Blume made a point that may sound pretentious but is actually profoundly true. Interviewer Susan Dominus sets up the quote: Read More >
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 0
As we all celebrate our Memorial Day holiday sweating over a grill or playing pickup football with our families, let's take a minute to think about the thing we're celebrating on this fine May day. Why do we take the day off from work and school? What sets this day apart from any other day?
Read More >
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 0
It sometimes worries me to see just how lightly and unthinkingly we Christians tend to engage with the culture. Let a big Christian family (thoroughly versed in Gothardism) get their own TV show, and many of us quickly adopt them as our mascots and standardbearers without really knowing all that much about them. Let the news come out that horrific acts took place within that family, and Twitter and Facebook overflow with the cry, "It's okay, the one who made mistakes has repented, so let's just forgive and move on!"

No. It's not okay. It's not okay that a teenage Josh Duggar molested little girls, including some of his own sisters. It's not okay that he committed crimes -- not mistakes, crimes -- and was never seriously held accountable. It's not okay that he went on to hold himself up as an example of sexual purity for others to follow. And it's not okay that some Christians are more eager to laud his public apology than to spare a thought for his innocent victims. Read More >
Rating: 5.00
Comments: 3
Many people have suggested that even if Christians are opposed to same-sex marriage, they still ought to go ahead and bake the wedding cake -- or do the flowers, or take the pictures, or make the rings, or whatever else is required of them.

But as Rod Dreher observes in a new blog post, what these commentators don't realize is that, for some in the LGBT movement, that still wouldn't be enough. Read More >
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 0
An editorial at The Stream takes issue with Jason Lee Steorts' recent defense of same-sex marriage. As Steorts is managing editor of National Review, the article states, his essay has troubling implications for the magazine and for the conservative movement as a whole: Read More >
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 1
Interesting article here by Kyle Smith about David Letterman's departure from "The Late Show" (H/T Mollie Hemingway). I was never a Letterman fan myself, but Smith was . . . until he wasn't. To hear him tell it, for years Letterman was cool by being deliberately, consciously anti-cool -- but then he sold out and became uncool by trying to be cool. If your head is spinning, this fun little analogy of Smith's may help: "Letterman was the barking dog who caught the car, was invited in, and curled up delightedly on the seat."

This raises a question, though Smith doesn't ask it openly: If one is obsessed with coolness, whether pursuing it or deliberately trying to go against it at every turn, is one doomed to wind up a slave to it?
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 0
An article published yesterday by the ACLJ displays the confusion of postmodern culture. Writer Skip Ash reports that the founder of the Military Religious Freedom Foundation (MRFF) called for the Air Force Chief of Staff to court martial Major General Craig Olson, USAF, for "sharing publicly that he was a Christian believer who valued prayer and giving God the credit for his successes as an Air Force officer." In short, a foundation for religious freedom was bothered by this man's free and civil expression of his faith.
Read More >
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 3
I'm a fan of neither the "Game of Thrones" HBO series, nor the Song of Fire and Ice book series by George R. R. Martin on which the show is based. (For anyone interested in a great critique of the latter, see this piece by N. W. Smith at Hipster Conservative.) I've arrived at that position based purely on what I consider good authority, rather than through firsthand experience.

Judging by the reaction of both fans and critics to Sunday's episode of the premium cable sensation, it sounds like my decision was justified. Evidently it includes a scene wherein one of the characters, Sansa Stark, is brutally, graphically raped. Of course, sexual violence and nudity (many would say pornography) have long been par-for-the-course on "Game of Thrones." But something about this particular instance touched a raw nerve with audiences.
Read More >
Rating: 5.00
Comments: 0
This morning, the U.S. Office of the Director of National Intelligence released a large number of documents from Osama bin Laden's compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, obtained by Navy SEALs in May of 2011. These documents included correspondence between bin Laden and other al Qaeda leaders as well as between bin Laden and his family members. Peter Bergen, in an article on CNN, points out the seemingly inconsistent pictures of the terrorist leader that these two types of correspondence offer. Bergen writes,

"In his final years hiding in a compound in Pakistan, Osama bin Laden was a man who at once showed great love [for] and interest in his own family while he coldly drew up quixotic plans for mass casualty attacks on Americans, according to documents seized by Navy SEALs the night he was killed."

Bergen's observation of these two diametrically opposed types of behaviors reveals an essential truth about the nature of fallen humanity.
Read More >
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 0
In an article published today by the American Enterprise Institute, Michael Rubin reflects on the legacy of Sir Nicholas Winton, a British hero who rescued 669 Czech children from Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia before the start of World War II.

As he offers congratulations to Sir Nicholas on his 106th birthday, Rubin ponders today's definition of a hero. Rubin writes: Read More >
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 0
I'd like to introduce you all to Leah Hickman, the summer 2015 BreakPoint editorial intern. Leah is a student at Hillsdale College and an experienced blogger and reviewer; you can see her work here, here, and here. We're very happy to have her with us!
Rating: 0.00
Comments: 1

See all articles in the archive.

BreakPoint Blog

Banner
Banner